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How long does it take to charge an electric vehicle?

The switch to an electric vehicle is becoming an easier choice every day, but one common concern is the length of time it takes to charge your vehicle.


The first four-wheeled, fuel-powered car in Britain was driven in 1892 and there are currently 32.9 million cars in the UK, according to the RAC Foundation. Just 2.6% of these cars are electric cars (460,000 battery electric vehicles and 384,000 plug-in hybrid vehicles) but this will change over the next 8 years and beyond as we move towards the government’s target of phasing out fuel-powered cars by 2030.


So, let’s ease some of your worries by finding out how long it really takes to charge an EV.



Home charging points


Home charging points usually have a powder rating of either 3.7kW or 7kW. A 3.7kW charger will charge around 15 miles per hour and a 7kW will provide around 30 miles an hour.


A typical EV has a 60kWh battery, meaning a 7Kw charger will take you from empty to full in around 8 hours. Most EV drivers opt for either overnight charging or top-up charges rather than waiting during the day (like you would with a phone).


Generally speaking, in 1 hour a 3.7kW charger will give you around 15 miles, and a 7kW charger will be 30 miles.



Rapid charging points


Of course, the larger the battery, the slower the charge so bear that in mind when choosing your EV.


With a 50kW rapid charger, you could add 100 miles in around 35 minutes. This is considered to be even more efficient than filling a petrol car because you don’t have to leave the comfort of your home!



How much does it cost to charge an EV?


For reference, the Tesla Model S has a 75kWh battery and takes 21 hours to charge on a 3.7kW charger, and 11 hours on a 7kW charger. A Nissan Leaf has a 40kWh battery, taking 11 hours to charge on a 3.7kW charger and 6 hours on a 7kW charger. See equations below:

Tesla Model S:


3700W x 21 hours = 77,700 / 1000 = 77.70 77.70 x 0.19kWh = £14.76 per charge on a 3.7kW charger

7000W x 11 hours = 77,000 / 1000 = 77 77 x 0.19kWh = £14.63 per charge on a 7kW charger

5000W x 2 hours = 10,000 / 1000 = 10 10 x 0.19kWh = £1.90 per charge on a 50kW charger

260 miles on full charge, average 10,000 miles a year = 39 full charges per year 39 x £14.63 = £570.57 yearly cost of charging Tesla Model S on a 7kW charger


Nissan Leaf:


3700W x 11 hours = 40,700 / 1000 = 40.70 40.70 x 0.19 kWh = £7.73 per charge on a 3.7kW charger

7000W x 6 hours = 42,000 / 1000 = 42 42 x 0.19 kWh = £7.98 per charge on a 7kW charger

5000W x 1 hours = 5000 / 1000 = 5 5 x 0.19kWh = £0.95 per charge on a 50kW charger

140 miles on full charge, average 10,000 miles a year = 72 full charges per year 72 x £7.98 = £574.56 yearly cost of charging Nissan Leaf on a 7kW charger


Therefore, with a 7kW charger for 10,000 miles year, a Tesla Model S will cost £570.57 and a Nissan Leaf will cost £574.56 per year respectively.


In comparison, the average cost of filling a petrol car is £1272 and diesel is £1683. That could mean a yearly saving of between £701.43-1112.43 for a Tesla, or £697.44-1108.44 for a Nissan Leaf.


So, who doesn’t fancy saving up to £1000 a year on fuel without having to leave your home? To have your own EV charge installed at your business, get in touch with our friendly team on 01827 211600 or email admin@chargeandrecharge.co.uk!

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